Quotes

The ‘Queenslander’ House

“The Queenslander house is a classic piece of Australian architectural design. With its distinctive timber and corrugated iron appearance, it breaks the monotony of the bland, master-planned display villages on the peripheries of our cities.

It’s also a great example of “vernacular architecture”, a term first coined by American writer/ architect Bernard Rudofsky in his 1964 book Architecture Without Architects. Vernacular architecture is best described as a traditional or indigenous type of architecture, one that has evolved over time in response to local climatic, environmental, building resources and cultural human needs. It is reflective of a very specific local context and is a functional and practical design response.

In Queensland, timber and iron vernacular houses emerged in the mid-19th century as a response by European migrants to the new subtropical climate. Wide verandas provided relief from the lengthy, hot summer days, punctuated by heavy afternoon downpours of rain. John Freeland, a former professor of architecture at UNSW describes the Queenslander as the closest Australia ever came to producing an indigenous style.”

I thought that those of you who live in our own special ‘Queenslander’ houses might like to see this. If you want to read more on what makes the ‘Queenslander’ house so unique, read this link….by Lindy Osborne, Lecturer in Architecture at Queensland University of Technology.

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